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Why To Never Be Habitually Late

late; time; tardy; fair; polite; professional

“I am the first to admit that I have sometimes made the mistake of not having the appropriate courtesy to forewarn of a potential tardiness, but I have learned over the years to do my very best, particularly when I am not in control of the current appointment in progress.”

It is probably safe to say that we live in a busy society — always on the go. Our professional and personal lives seem to be busier than ever, or at least that is the perception often we read or hear about.

Many probably have days that sometimes seem like everything is a total blur from sitting down at the desk in the morning until the moment you get up and leave the office to go home.

Business meetings can run long, and many of the delays are out of your personal control. This can be burdensome and stressful especially if you have a stacked day. To help reduce some of that stress, and to respect the busy schedule of others, send a quick apologetic note in advance of the next meeting either via text or email to the organizer and or participants to give them the courtesy of knowing you are running late.

I am the first to admit that I have sometimes made the mistake of not having the appropriate courtesy to forewarn of a potential tardiness, but I have learned over the years to do my very best, particularly when I am not in control of the current appointment in progress.

What concerns me more than anything are those individuals that are habitually late and do not have the respect and common courtesy to let others know in advance. For example, if someone is scheduled to have dinner with you at 8 p.m., but they do not arrive until 8:45 p.m., and gave you no notice, is it appropriate? Not at all and it is disrespectful. Unfortunately, some people don’t realize they’re being rude or probably just don’t care.

I try my very best to provide notice in advance, when possible, and if necessary to reschedule, so that I am mindful and respectful of others’ time. Being in the service industry now, I fully understand when the client needs to make a change or is going to be late. As a matter of fact, I pride myself on being able to adapt to my clients’ needs, including rescheduling and being as flexible as possible for them. I am very lucky to be working with clients and individuals in those companies that are just as respectful of other individuals’ time.

Individuals in certain service professions are very guilty of this practice, and sadly they believe this behavior is completely

acceptable.

One would think that when you are in a service profession, it is NOT acceptable to be late without prior notice or discussion with your clients or other colleagues. Unless there is a true emergency, why would someone be so rude as to be late to a meeting or appointment with the individual(s) with whom you’ve agreed to meet at a specific date and time.

Is it a sign of complete disrespect? Yes.

Is the person that is habitually late truly clueless of how disrespectful it is, especially when they’re in a service provider role? Probably.

What do you think?

Patrick Callahan worked for Fortune 50 companies for nearly 25 years before starting his own political compliance services firm in 2011. Follow the Centurion Group DC on LinkedIn or via Twitter.

Image source: McMillianSpeed.com; Business Week